laurie-burrows-grad

Laurie Burrows Grad is a grief blogger, cookbook author, television chef, food journalist, and activist/fundraiser.  She continues to be an active food writer and is currently the Editor-in-Chief for one of the top food sites on the web, www.epicurus.com, where she contributes regular features on travel and food.  On August 1, 2015 Laurie’s husband Peter died suddenly.  Overwhelmed by the loss of her husband she began blogging about grief on the Huffington Post Huffington Post Blog. Laurie’s many blogs have helped her deal with her grief and have also helped others, who have responded positively to her honest and raw emotions.

Twenty-four years ago, she created an annual, star-studded fundraising dinner, A Night at Sardi’s, and has been the event’s chairperson ever since, along with her husband Peter Grad, raising over 30 million dollars. Sardis Website

This site will chronicle Laurie’s journey through grief as well as inform you of other useful lifestyle and cooking tips that are part of her work. 

Recent Blog Posts

IMPERMANENCE IN GRIEF

“Nothing endures but change” Heraclitus Everything is predisposed to change.  Every aspect of our lives goes through transformation.  Nothing is everlasting.  All physical and emotional concepts and relationships grow, change, fade, and eventually die. “To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: A time to be born, […]

CINDERELLA LOOKING FOR PRINCE CHARMING?

Once upon a time there was a pretty-good looking princess named Laurie who serendipitously met her handsome prince charming named Peter.  She swooned at his kindness, sense of humor, love of all things edible, excluding veggies, and gorgeous head of hair.  He fell in love with her blond tresses even with the peroxide applications, her […]

ALL YOU NEVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT GRIEF

I recently passed the two-year marker date of Peter’s death, and looked back at my blogs which reflect my roller-coaster-of-a-journey through grief.  My writing chronicles the ups and downs (unfortunately more downs that ups), and the slow healing process towards my new life of plausible acceptability.  Grief is a long and arduous process. Grief is […]

DON’T WORRY BABY. Living in the Present with Grief

“Do not anticipate trouble, or worry about what may never happen. Keep in the sunlight.” -Benjamin Franklin Worry is defined as “giving way to anxiety or unease.” Worry is allowing one’s mind to dwell on difficulties and misfortunes. It is the state of fretting, stressing out, stewing over something, and tormenting oneself. Simply put, it […]

A SIGH IS NOT A SIGH

“You must remember this A kiss is just a kiss, a sigh is just a sigh. The fundamental things apply As time goes by.” Herman Hupfeld from the movie Casablanca I was always a sigher.  I sighed in frustration when I had a glitch with my computer.  I sighed happily when I saw love scenes […]

THE COMFORTING ARMS OF A SUPPORT GROUP

When Peter died, almost two years ago, I openly welcomed all the help I could get.  I went to a grief therapist and learned tools for coping with the daily onslaught of bottomless and relentless pain.  I learned to find solace in the support of my friends and family, and accepted their cradling arms and […]

THE POWER OF THE KEYBOARD

“I can shake off everything as I write; my sorrows disappear, my courage is reborn.” ― Anne Frank   Our Western values are not culturally equipped for grief.  Death is such a taboo that we call it the “D-word,” the way we used to refer to cancer as the “C-word.”  By tagging grief as a […]

FLYING SOLO

Every time my husband, Peter and I traveled together, we would settle into our seats on the airplane.  As the plane took off, he would lace my much smaller fingers cozily into his sizable digits.  As the plane climbed upward, we would grip each other’s hand, sometimes tighter than blood flow allowed, especially if the […]